Unionville Grapevine

January 29, 2015

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3 Style Choices that Make Unionville’s Wines Unique

Unionville’s winemaker Cameron Stark is dedicated to creating wines that highlight varietal flavors and terroir. Driven to showcase the fruit character and food-friendly acidity of wines from our estate vineyards, Stark forgoes the “butter” and sweet oak by limiting malolactic fermentation, using neutral French oak barrels, and using pure fruit.

White grapes at a New Jersey vineyard and winery

1. Limited Malolactic Fermentation

Malolactic fermentation occurs in the wine making process after primary fermentation (sugar → alcohol) has finished. Oenococcus oeni, one of the key players in malolactic fermentation, is responsible for imparting the buttery notes found in some Chardonnays.

At Unionville Vineyards, we limit malolactic fermentation in our Chardonnays. The result: fruit-forward wine that has a higher acidity, which imparts a crisp clean finish on the palate and makes it perfect for pairing with food.

2. Neutral Oak Barrels

French oak barrels filled with New Jersey wine

Stacy Brody, our Operations Coordinator, likes to compare oak barrels to tea bags. “Neutral oak barrels are tea bags that have been used a few times. The essence is still there, but it is muted.”

By using neutral oak barrels, we allow the unique flavors of each varietal to be prominent in the final wines. New oak, particularly American, can impart strong wood and vanilla notes, which often dominate the delicate flavors of the grape. At Unionville, we use all French oak, mostly neutral.

3. Pure Fruit that Produces Fruit Forward Wine

“Managing every grape from vine to bottle.”

Varietal and site typicity are our main focus at Unionville Vineyards. Managing five estate vineyards, totaling 54 acres under vine, we know that each site is unique.

We continually showcase each vineyard and its unique characters. We have Pinot Noir Clone 115 on four different sites, and each one tastes different. In order to express the grape in its truest form, we are very diligent about harvest time and yeast selection. This diligence creates a balanced fruit-forward wine with depth.

Unionville’s goal is to make the best wine on the east coast. Period. Cameron pays homage to the grape’s varietal expression by using fresh hand-picked berries. Neutral French oak barrels and limited malolactic fermentation allow the pure expression of a grape’s typicity as well as the vineyard’s terroir. A recipe sure to create a yummy wine.

Wine Pairing: Seared Sole over Arugula with Rosemary Potatoes With Unionville Home Chardonnay

Recipe: Sole paired with New Jersey wine (Chardonnay)

Writing tasting notes is a team activity at Unionville. Whoever is at the winery, minion or guest, gets a glass and a pour. Everyone swirls, sniffs, and sips and we take turns sharing what our senses pick up. We popped open a bottle of the 2013 Unionville Home Single Vineyard Chardonnay and set to work. Lemon, orange blossom, and peach were unanimously agreed upon. Someone even suggested creamsicle due to the bright flavor yet subtle creaminess.  While we were tasting, Cameron described a mouthwatering dish that pairs well with our new wine. Sauteed grey sole coated in lemon zest and white pepper panko crumbs, served on a bed of wilted arugula. A light refreshing dinner and a nice break from the endless stews I seem to be eating. 

Roasted potatoes with herbs, paired with Unionville Chardonnay

I stopped at my local market on my way home and cooked up an early dinner. I couldn't help myself, the recipe sounded too good. The baby arugula has a light spiciness, which balances the wine's creaminess. The rosemary adds an earthy element that pairs well with the citrus of both the wine and the fillet. The pairing of wine and food may be, as Sid Goldstein of The Wine Lover's Cookbook says, a complex and highly inexact science, but I've found much success breaking down why these pairings work and much satisfaction testing and tasting.  

Roasted potatoes with herbs, paired with New Jersey Chardonnay

My fish market had very thin fillets. I opted to serve two per person. Depending on the thickness, adjust serving size and cooking time accordingly. 

Seared Sole over Arugula with Rosemary Potatoes 

ingredients

total time: 45 min          yields: 2 servings
  • 4 sole fillets
  • 2 tablespoons of lemon zest - about two lemons
  • 1 lemon quartered for serving
  • 1 ½ cups of buttermilk
  • 1 cup of white pepper panko breadcrumbs
  • A handful of arugula to cover each plate
  • 1-2 lbs of red skinned potatoes quartered
  • 1 sprigs of rosemary chopped
  • 2 tablespoon of extra virgin olive oil separated
  • salt and pepper to taste

directions

  • preheat oven to 400F
  • place a covered sauce pot over high heat - salt generously
  • while the water is coming to a boil, combine lemon zest, bread crumbs, salt and to taste - mix well
  • dredge sole in buttermilk and set aside
  • once the water is boiling, add potatoes and parboil for 5 minutes. When finished your fork will just barely break the outside of the potato but not go all the way through. Think al dente pasta.
  • when the potatoes are finished drain and place in a bowl. add 1 tablespoon of olive oil, salt and pepper to taste, and chopped rosemary - toss to evenly coat potatoes
  • place potatoes on a baking sheet and bake in the oven for about 20 minutes - about halfway through shake the pan
  • remove the sole from the buttermilk and place in the bowl with the breadcrumbs - take care to cover the entire fillet.
  • heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a saute pan over medium heat. once the pan is hot, place two fillets in the pan and cook on each side for about 2-3 minutes depending on the fillet’s thickness. flip and cook for another 2-3 minutes. cook fillets in batches of 2.
  • serve the sole with a wedge of lemon over a bed of baby arugula and a side of roasted rosemary potatoes
  • pour a glass of 2013 Unionville Home Chardonnay. cheers!

Sauteed sole with potatoes and arugula, paired with New Jersey Chardonnay

Wine Pairing: Roasted Veggies with a Bechamel Sauce and Marsanne Roussanne

I cannot get enough of roasted root vegetables. I could eat them every night. Roasting is one of the easiest, most magical ways to prepare vegetables.

Hot out of the oven, they are crispy salty sweet treats. Left overs? Roasted veggies are perfect for a colorful hearty salad the next day. You can't go wrong. Think of these veggies as more diversified french fries.

When cooked at a high enough temperature, the naturally occurring sugar in the root veggies will caramelize. Vinegar will amplify these flavors bringing out a slightly nutty taste. Serve alongside a cream sauce, and pair with a dry, nutty, white wine such as Unionville Vineyards’ Marsanne Roussanne and you are in for a real treat!


ROASTED ROOT VEGGIES WITH BECHAMEL SAUCE

ingredients

total time: 1 hr       yield: 4-6 servings

  • 2-3 purple potatoes; diced into cubes
  • 2 sweet potatoes; diced into cubes
  • 4 parsnips; diced into cubes
  • 3 turnips; diced into cubes
  • 4 beets, diced into cubes
  • 5 carrots; diced into cubes
  • 2 onions; quartered
  • 3 cloves of garlic; minced
  • 3 tablespoons of olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar
  • salt and pepper to taste

directions

  • preheat oven to 400F.
  • I prefer to eat the skins of my root veggies, if you do not like the skins feel free to peel them - if not just make sure you give them a good rinse and maybe a little scrub to make sure you get all the dirt off. Cut off the tops and bottoms and dice into bite sized cubes.
  • Add olive oil, vinegar, and the diced vegetables, except the onions and garlic, into a large mixing bowl. Top with a generous pinch of salt and fresh cracked pepper.
  • Toss the vegetables, sometimes this is easier to do with another bowl on top, until they are evenly coated in olive oil and seasoning
  • Place vegetables onto a roasting pan and place the pan in a preheated oven for about 30 minutes. You do not want the vegetables to be too close to one another or they will steam instead of roast. If you find that your veggies look cramped, use two pans instead of one!
  • Check the oven a few times throughout the cooking process to shake the pan and make sure no one is sticking.
  • When the vegetables look almost done - around 25-30 minutes of cooking, add the onions and garlic and shake the pan well to incorporate them. Continue cooking until the onions are nice and wilted about 15 more minutes.
  • Serve as a side dish with Honey Roasted Chicken and a glass of Unionville Vineyards’ Marsanne Roussanne.
  • If you are serving immediately, top with a bechamel sauce. If these crispy morsels stay in the bechamel sauce for too long, they will get a little soft. If in doubt, serve the sauce alongside for dipping!

Wine Pairing: Honey Roasted Chicken and Cranberry Relish with Marsanne Roussanne

I have always eaten my condiments with food, not my food with condiments. My mom loves to tell stories of me licking ketchup off of french fries.  I know there are other condiment lovers out there! Are french fries not merely a vehicle for the ketchup?

As I began to experiment in the kitchen, I started by perfecting recipes for the condiments I enjoyed as a kid.  My recent obsession- honey mustard. Local honey simmered with fresh whole grain mustard - to die for.

We all know that honey mustard and chicken are a classic combination. Instead of a dipping sauce, simmer the chicken in the honey mustard with fresh herbs and dry white wine. The house will smell fantastic - drawing your family to the dinner table!

I prefer to cook this in a cast iron skillet, as a one pot meal. If you do not have a cast iron skillet, simply saute the onions and garlic in a standard skillet; then use a baking dish to cook your chicken.

Wine Pairing

Marsanne and Roussanne are two white grape varieties traditionally hailing from the the Rhone valley.


This full bodied white wine, has the brightness of lemon with subtle floral hints of honey suckle. An old dynamic duo - Marsanne adds structure while Roussanne adds more aromatic notes - together they create a medium to full bodied white wine. Its supreme ability to age makes it a collector's favorite. Aging imparts more nutty notes than citrus.


Similar to Chardonnay or Viognier, a dry white wine pairs naturally with most chicken recipes. The tartness of the cranberry relish and earthy notes of the herbs make Marsanne Roussanne my go-to wine for this pairing.

 

HONEY ROASTED CHICKEN AND CRANBERRY RELISH

ingredients

total time: 45 minutes   yield: 4 servings

  • 3 tablespoons of dijon mustard
  • 3 tablespoons of honey
  • 3 tablespoons of whole grain mustard or honey mustard of your choice
  • ½ tsp of fresh grated ginger
  • 2 sprigs of thyme and marjoram
  • 4 chicken thighs
  • 1 tablespoon of olive oil
  • ¼ cup of Marsanne Roussanne
  • 1 yellow onion chopped
  • 2 cloves of garlic minced

rub

  • 1 tablespoon of whole grain mustard
  • 1 tablespoon of olive oil
  • salt and pepper to taste

directions

  • Preheat your oven to 400F.
  • Mustard Rub: Combine mustard, olive oil, salt and pepper in a small bowl. Using your fingers or a brush work the rub into both sides of the chicken. Set aside
  • For the Sauce: Whisk together the mustards, honey, ginger, and olive oil into a small bowl and set aside
  • For the Chicken: Heat one tablespoon of olive oil in your cast iron skillet, or standard skillet, over medium heat. Once the oil is hot, add your onions and garlic. Cook until golden brown or about 5 minutes. Add the chicken and sear for 2-3 minutes on both sides. Add the ¼ cup of wine and honey mustard sauce. Nestle in a few sprigs of fresh herbs and place in the preheated oven for about 25-30 minutes or until chicken has reached the internal cooking temperature.
  • Serve along side rice to soak up the honey mustard sauce. Enjoy with cranberry relish to brighten the dish and pair with Unionville Vineyards’ Marsanne Roussane!  
December 20, 2014

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Great Things Do Come from New Jersey.

There is no rest for the wicked, but there are parties!


The Unionville Vineyards team celebrated the season with a potluck dinner, and we throw a darn good potluck.

The buffet table was overflowing with everything from grilled Haloumi cheese to chicken Marsala to Moroccan tagine to honey whiskey cupcakes. You know those cupcakes were gone before I could whip my phone out to snap a photo.


We love food almost as much as we love wine. Just look at all the mouthwatering recipes we share! Cam even broke out the grill and cooked up some flank steaks for the team.

 

 We were all enjoying ourselves when we learned Cam had yet another trick up his sleeve…


He quieted us, a tough task, and announced that we should empty and rinse out our glasses because he was about to start us on a blind tasting of five white wines, broken into two rounds.


Round One

For the first set of three wines we were told the following

  1.      All wines were the same variety: Chardonnay
  2.      The wines came from 3 different regions: France, New Jersey, and California.

We tasted the first wine. Immediately, aromas of vanilla and caramel leapt from the glass, followed by citrus, orange. In the mouth, creamy, rich, buttery. Definitely some new oak. Definitely malolactic fermentation.  This has to be California, we guessed. This is not Unionville’s wine.


We tasted the second wine. This one showcased the fruit: white peach and lemon zest, with notes of white flowers. Much sleeker, leaner than the first. Flint on the finish. Had to be French. Had to be!


We tasted the third wine. Pure fruit. Meyer lemon and those same white flowers. Good acidity and flavor throughout. No oak on the nose or on the palate. A pure expression of the variety and the terroir. This was ours. We were proud – ours runs with the best of them.

Then the reveal!

Number one: Mount Eden 2011 Chardonnay. California. 95 points from Wine Spectator. From the producer’s technical notes, we learned the wine was fermented and aged in 75% new French oak and completed 100% malolactic fermentation. Average retail price $70.


Number two: Meursault Sous le Dos D’ane. Côte D’Or, Burgundy. 92 Points Wine Spectator. Average retail $150.


Number three: Unionville’s 2012 Pheasant Hill Vineyard Chardonnay. New Jersey. Featured at the New Jersey Food and Wine Festival at Crystal Springs. Fermented and aged in neutral French oak barrels. Retail $51.95.


Unlike many consumers, we believe great wines can come from New Jersey. We were proved right.   


Round Two

The second round of blind tasting included two wines. We could see these wine were white. We knew nothing beyond that, not the region or the variety. Nothing.


Cam was testing us.


The first had notes of flowers, oak and hazelnuts, with a hint of Gewürztraminer-like spice. In the mouth, rich, full-bodied, almost oily, viscous.


Cam started pouring the last wine. Wow, white flowers! Strong floral notes, minerality on the palate. Start to finish a beautiful wine with a rich mouthfeel.


“Vouvray,” someone guessed.

“Our Marsanne-Roussanne,” suggested Natalie.

How did you know?” Cam was flabbergasted.

“We tasted it at Matt’s a few weeks ago.”


She was right! We had brought a bottle to a team dinner at Matt’s Red Rooster a few weeks ago, and she remembered!


The reveal

The first wine -  Saint Joseph “Lieu-Dit,” produced by E. Guigal, a well-respected producer in the Rhône region of France. This bottle retails for around $58.

The second wine - OUR Amwell Ridge Marsanne-Roussanne to be released in mid-January. It will retail for $29.95.


We know our wines are good. Now, we tell you from experience our wines are as good as the best of them.


Great things do come from New Jersey.

 

Wine Pairing: Lemon Meringue Pie and Cool Foxy Lady

It was the middle of the summer when I started working at Unionville, and we were just releasing the 2013 Cool Foxy Lady. Made from 100% late-harvest Vidal grapes, Cool Foxy Lady, with a velvety sweetness and subtle hints of citrus, is our unique twist on the classic ice wine. In the tasting room, one of our team members always asks our guests to envision eating a slice of Lemon Meringue pie while sipping Cool Foxy Lady. The tartness of the pie contrasts the sweetness of the wine - refreshing your taste buds. 

My father and I love lemon meringue pie! I bake this dessert for holiday parties, when I want to offer a light refreshing alternative at the dessert table. This year, I will be baking this pie and serving it alongside Cool Foxy Lady. It is a perfect pairing! Do you offer a unique dessert at your holiday parties? Tell us below!! 

 

 

 

 

 

Ingredients

Yield 1 9in pie     Total Time: ~3 hrs. Includes some time for cooling
  •  1 graham cracker pie crust

Lemon filling

  • 4 egg yolks - save the whites for the meringue
  • 3 1/2 tbsp cornstarch
  • 1 1/2 cups water
  • 1 1/4 cups of fine sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1/2 cup lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon finely grated lemon zest
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract 
For the Meringue
  • 4 egg whites
  • 1/2 tsp cream of tartar 
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 6 tbsp fine sugar

 

Directions 

 Lemon Filling 

  • Preheat the oven to 350F. 
  • In a saucepan, over medium heat, combine 1 cup of sugar, flour, cornstarch, and salt. Whisk together.
  • Add water, lemon juice, lemon zest, and vanilla extract

  • Cook over medium-high heat until the mixture, also known as curd, comes to a boil. Stir constantly!
  • Stir in butter. 
  • Add the egg yolks to a separate bowl and slowly whisk in the sugar mixture. Once you have added about half of the sugar mixture to the egg yolks, return the contents of the bowl to the sauce pan. Reduce heat to low

  • Cook the curd on low until it is nice and thick - depending on your stove top and preferences this can take up to 15 minutes. Make sure your stove top is set to low. If you need to, add a heat diffuser to reduce heat. 
  • Once the mixture is thick enough, pour it into the pie shell.
  • Cover the entire filling with meringue - taking care to seal the edges. See below for meringue instructions.

 

  • Place in on a rack in the middle of the oven for 10-15 minutes or until pie is golden brown.

  • Allow the pie to cool for 2 hours, or until you can comfortably touch the underside of the pie pan. 

For the Meringue

  • Using either a hand held mixer or a stand mixer, begin to beat your egg whites on low. Gradually increase the speed and beat on high for 2 minutes. 
  • Add the cream of tartar and vanilla extract
  • Beat for another minute
  • Gradually add the sugar and beat for until you have stiff peaks. Check every few minutes - you do not want to over beat! 

To test your peaks, turn your whisk upside down. The meringue should cling to the whisk and hold their peak without collapsing. 

 Once the pie is cool, serve alongside a glass of Cool Foxy Lady.  Tell us about your favorite dessert and wine pairings below. 

5 Practical Gifts for Wine Lovers

Wine lovers rarely love just wine - they also love the food and accessories that elevate the overall wine sipping experience. They often, however, see these goodies as "splurges" - and put off purchasing such items for themselves. Problem for them - good thing for us. What could be a more perfect gift? Below you will find the Top 5 Gifts for Wine Lovers tried and true - I can assure you I will be bringing a few of these treats to loved ones in my family! Stop by the winery to pick up the perfect gifts for the wine lovers in your family this holiday season. 

 

Psst...pay attention to the theme - this is the ticket to a wine lover's heart!



 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 1. Cheese and accouterments - also known as fancy food toppings

 

When I am home alone, my go-to dinner is a bottle of dry red wine and a cheese platter. Properly paired, the cheeses bring out subtle nuances of the wine while not overwhelming the palate. I fill the plate with accoutrements, including dried fruits and nuts.  If your loved one is not a fan of red wine, don't worry. There are wine and cheese pairings for all palates. For a bold, dry red, go with a sharp aged cheese like cheddar. Unionville Vineyard’s German style Riesling pairs well with a fresh, young cheese. Does your loved one enjoy a bloomy rind cheese such as a brie - go with our Classic Chardonnay. Complete the plate with a drizzle of honey and spoonful of fruit compote - what a perfect date night for two!

 

2. Chocolate

Chocolate, in all of it’s chocolaty goodness, contains a whole palate of flavors that often go unnoticed. Pair this chocolate, made by Robinson's with Unionville's red wine, with Cabernet Sauvignon, and begin to notice notes of sweetness, acidity, and a slight fruitiness - enhancing the boldest flavors in our red wine.

3. Wine bottle tote

 

A wine bottle tote is an absolute must for every wine lover. This tote is the perfect size for a bottle of your favorite wine, some cheese, and crackers - making it the go-to picnic accessory. 

 

4. Wine stoppers and bottle openers

 

Over the summer, I was conducting a wine tasting when the two unthinkables happened. First, I forgot a wine opener. Second, a good Samaritan, who was cleaning up the facility, threw away my corks.  Without my emergency bottle opener or cork, the evening would have involved an unexpected trip to the store - more time and more money. This duo, the alpha and omega of the wine evening, makes the perfect stocking stuffer for any wine lover. Between impromptu wine picnics and spontaneous cleaning brigades, it is handy to have a few of these stashed away. 

 

5. Dispenser

Wine lovers are often also great hosts. With a kind open heart, they want to extend the experience of fantastic wine to all of their loved ones. Last week, I was hosting a get together, and at the very last minute decided I wanted to create a "Make your Own" cheese plate station. With mounds of different cheeses, dried fruits, and nuts I needed a way for my guests to drizzle their cheese plate in a condiment of their choice. Then I remembered I had a few festive dispensers. Filled with extra virgin olive oil or honey, these are a beautiful and practical way to dress up an appetizer table.

 

 

 

Stop by the winery to see the other holiday gifts we have this year and pick up a bottle of wine to go with all of the goodies.

Wine Pairing: Chocolate Lava Cake with Vat 20 Port

Do you remember the post I wrote a few weeks ago, “Top Four Reasons Why Port is Amazing?” Well,ladies and gents, I have greatly underestimated this divine wine. There are not simply four reasons why Port is amazing, there are at least FIVE reasons why Port is amazing. Recently, I discovered that the fifth reason why Unionville Vineyard’s Port is amazing is because it pairs with chocolate - dark chocolate with sea salt or dark chocolate covered figs.  There could not be a more perfect pair - chocolate and Port! So for you tonight, and in celebration of our Vat 20 Port release this weekend, I have a pairing of Chocolate Lava Cakes with Raspberry Compote and Unionville’s Vat 20 Port.



ingredients

Yield: 2-3 cakes      Time: ~35 min
  • 2 tablespoons salted butter, plus more for muffin tin
  • 1/3 cup confectioners' sugar, plus more for muffin tin and serving
  • cocoa powder for dusting
  • 1 ounce semisweet baking chocolate, broken into pieces
  • 1 ounce bittersweet baking chocolate, broken into pieces
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 large egg yolk
  • 1 teaspoon espresso powder
  • Pinch salt
  • 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • nonstick spray

directions

  • Preheat your oven to 400 degrees.
  • Spray your muffin tin with a nonstick spray, such as PAM.
  • Dust the muffin tin with confectioners’ sugar and cocoa powder.

  • Place the butter and chocolate in a microwave-safe bowl. Microwave on high in 20-second increments. Use a whisk or fork to stir after each increment.  
  • While the chocolate is melting, whisk together the egg, egg yolk, sugar, espresso powder, and salt. Once the chocolate mixture is melted, whisk it into the egg mixture to combine. Add flour and whisk just until combined - take care to not overmix.
  • Pour batter into prepared muffin tins. Fill the empty muffin tins with water so that your lava cakes cook evenly. 

  • Bake until the top has just set and a toothpick inserted in center comes out wet, 5-6 minutes. It is better to under-bake than over-bake!
  • Cool cakes for 10 minutes on a wire rack. Use a knife to loosen the cakes and serve inverted. Immediately top with Raspberry Mint Compote.

    November 22, 2014

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    Wine Cellar Chronicles: Racking Wine

    Just in time for the holidays, the last of Unionville Vineyards’ 2014 red wine has gone through the final racking process! It is amazing to see the grape’s lifecycle.  First, the beautiful fruit comes in hand-picked off the vine. Next, it is mashed and goes through primary fermentation. Now you have fermenting grape juice, with skins and seeds, or what is known as grape must. After this, we begin to rack the wine, using a pump to move the wine from container to container. This could be barrel to tank, tank to tank, or tank to barrel. While fermenting, the sugars are reduced, alcohol starts to form, and the juice starts to acquire the characteristics of a young wine.  During this process,dead yeast and remaining grape skins settle to the bottom of the container. It is essential that this gunk, referred to as lees, is removed in order to clarify the wine.
     
    Now that the wine is clarified and in barrel, it will begin to go through secondary fermentation, a process where lactic acid forms from malic acid, which naturally occurs in the grape must. During malolactic fermentation, these tart characteristics are softened and rounded out - enhancing the wine’s flavor profile and body. The wine will sit in the barrel for a year and a half before the next stage of the winemaking process begins.

    Did you know, that while the wine is in barrel the winemakers are still tinkering with it? Evaporation and fermentation can take unexpected twists and turns, and it is crucial to keep a watchful eye. Stay tuned to learn the Winemaker’s Steps to Happy and Healthy Yeast.

    Roasted Caramelized Brussels Sprout Salad: Thanksgiving Side

    Roasted anything is delicious. Roasted Brussels sprouts is hands down the most delicious of all! Their little leaves become crispy like potato chips. Drizzled in maple syrup and sprinkled with chili powder, this smokey sweet treat is the perfect side dish for Thanksgiving. I began making this dish a few years ago as simply roasted Brussels sprouts, but by the time they were served they were no longer hot and had lost some of their crisp - in a way losing some of their pitzaz. I then had the genius idea to turn it into a salad.  A sprinkle of feta, some chopped red onion, and some balsamic glaze and BAM. The pitzaz is back. 

     

    Similar the Roasted Sweet Potato and Browned Butter, this is another side dish that is not only seasonally appropriate for Thanksgiving but pairs well with the earthy yet soft fruity notes of Unionville Vineyards's Pinot Noir Reserve

     

    Ingredients: 

    3 lbs of Brussels sprouts halved - the key here is uniform size

    1/2 tbsp maple syrup 

    1 tbsp of olive oil 

    1 tsp of chili powder

    1/4 cup of feta cheese

    1 tsp of salt

    1 tsp of cracked black pepper

    1 red onion - minced 

    balsamic glaze 

     

    Directions: 

    • Preheat oven to 400F. While the oven is preheating prepare the Brussels sprouts. Using a sharp knife, cut off the woody end. Remove any damaged outer leaves and cut in half

     

     

    • Place the Brussels sprouts in a mixing bowl and add the olive oil, chili powder, salt and fresh cracked pepper. 

     

     

    • Place the Brussels sprouts on a sheet pan and put in the preheated oven for 30 minutes. Shake the pan every 10 minutes to ensure even cooking. When the Brussels sprouts are finished they will be slightly browned and crispy.

     

     

    • When the Brussels sprouts are finished remove from the oven. Toss in a mixing bowl with the minced onion and 1/2 tbsp of maple syrup. Salt and pepper to taste.  
    • Transfer the Brussels sprouts to a serving bowl and top with feta cheese and a generous drizzle of balsamic glaze. Serve along side your Thanksgiving dinner or as a side to any meal for an extra special pop!