Wine Pairing: Lemon Meringue Pie and Cool Foxy Lady

December 11, 2014

It was the middle of the summer when I started working at Unionville, and we were just releasing the 2013 Cool Foxy Lady. Made from 100% late-harvest Vidal grapes, Cool Foxy Lady, with a velvety sweetness and subtle hints of citrus, is our unique twist on the classic ice wine. In the tasting room, one of our team members always asks our guests to envision eating a slice of Lemon Meringue pie while sipping Cool Foxy Lady. The tartness of the pie contrasts the sweetness of the wine - refreshing your taste buds. 

My father and I love lemon meringue pie! I bake this dessert for holiday parties, when I want to offer a light refreshing alternative at the dessert table. This year, I will be baking this pie and serving it alongside Cool Foxy Lady. It is a perfect pairing! Do you offer a unique dessert at your holiday parties? Tell us below!! 

 

 

 

 

 

Ingredients

Yield 1 9in pie     Total Time: ~3 hrs. Includes some time for cooling
  •  1 graham cracker pie crust

Lemon filling

  • 4 egg yolks - save the whites for the meringue
  • 3 1/2 tbsp cornstarch
  • 1 1/2 cups water
  • 1 1/4 cups of fine sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1/2 cup lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon finely grated lemon zest
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract 
For the Meringue
  • 4 egg whites
  • 1/2 tsp cream of tartar 
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 6 tbsp fine sugar

 

Directions 

 Lemon Filling 

  • Preheat the oven to 350F. 
  • In a saucepan, over medium heat, combine 1 cup of sugar, flour, cornstarch, and salt. Whisk together.
  • Add water, lemon juice, lemon zest, and vanilla extract

  • Cook over medium-high heat until the mixture, also known as curd, comes to a boil. Stir constantly!
  • Stir in butter. 
  • Add the egg yolks to a separate bowl and slowly whisk in the sugar mixture. Once you have added about half of the sugar mixture to the egg yolks, return the contents of the bowl to the sauce pan. Reduce heat to low

  • Cook the curd on low until it is nice and thick - depending on your stove top and preferences this can take up to 15 minutes. Make sure your stove top is set to low. If you need to, add a heat diffuser to reduce heat. 
  • Once the mixture is thick enough, pour it into the pie shell.
  • Cover the entire filling with meringue - taking care to seal the edges. See below for meringue instructions.

 

  • Place in on a rack in the middle of the oven for 10-15 minutes or until pie is golden brown.

  • Allow the pie to cool for 2 hours, or until you can comfortably touch the underside of the pie pan. 

For the Meringue

  • Using either a hand held mixer or a stand mixer, begin to beat your egg whites on low. Gradually increase the speed and beat on high for 2 minutes. 
  • Add the cream of tartar and vanilla extract
  • Beat for another minute
  • Gradually add the sugar and beat for until you have stiff peaks. Check every few minutes - you do not want to over beat! 

To test your peaks, turn your whisk upside down. The meringue should cling to the whisk and hold their peak without collapsing. 

 Once the pie is cool, serve alongside a glass of Cool Foxy Lady.  Tell us about your favorite dessert and wine pairings below. 





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