UV Wine & Food Pairing Class

November 01, 2015

Last Sunday we had our first Wine and Food pairing class.  This was such a hit that all eight attendees have pre-booked for January.  Since I am both a Sommelier and a Chef, I look at wine and food differently.  I don’t look at them as individual components as much as a union of flavors.  This was my goal for our food pairing class, and I think we did a pretty good job.

 

For those of you that don’t know, Unionville Vineyards produces a winning duo of Marsanne and Roussanne grapes. These are both French grapes from the northern Rhone region of France.  Each grape has its own personality, that when combined, really become something special.  Marsanne is known for fruit notes of orange, pear, ripe lemon and tropical fruit along with earthier notes of almond and spice. Roussanne has notes of citrus rind, white cherry, yellow apple and pear along with fresh herbs, herbal tea and honeysuckle. 

 

Together these two become the dynamic duo of Thanksgiving wine.  Marsanne pairs well with butter, cream and root vegetables to only name a few. Rousanne makes friends with thick and creamy soups, pasta, yams, mashed potatoes, goose, turkey and even honey-glazed ham. This team can match both these foods in texture and with it’s balanced acidity, cut through their richness. Need I say more?

 

For this wine, I paired it with a leek tart.  In this tart I added mushrooms, peas and herbed goat cheese.  Earthiness in the mushrooms along with the peas are counterpoint to the goat cheese;  a perfect companion for our Marsanne/Roussanne blend.  The ingredients of this dish can be made the night before and then fill the pie shell in the morning if need be.

 

Leek Tart with Mushrooms, Peas and Herbed Goat Cheese

 

1 basic pie dough (I use Pillsbury when in a crunch)

3 Leeks- halved and sliced thin

1/2 stick of butter

2 cups mushrooms-halved

1 cups fresh or frozen peas

1 log Herbed Goat Cheese-approximately 8 ounces.

3 eggs

1 1/2 cup milk

Salt and Pepper

 

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees and arrange rack on lowest setting in oven.

 

In a large saute’ pan add the butter and mushrooms.  Try not to crowd the pan.  The trick to getting the most flavor out of your mushroom is to leave them alone.  Mushrooms are full of water and the moisture inside will allow the fungi to saute’ much longer than you would think.  Once in the pan on medium high, the mushrooms will caramelize and bring out great rich brown colors and earthy flavors.  If the mushrooms are moved around, they’ll cook, but you’ll miss out on their true potential. 

 

Once you’ve achieved significant color add the leeks and saute’ until tender.  Maybe 4-5 minutes. Add the peas and sprinkle with salt and pepper.

 

Roll out the dough onto a non-stick Teflon pan (preferably the type with a bottom that can be removed).  Prick the bottom of the dough with a fork and add your leek mixture.  Now pinch off pieces of the goat cheese and arrange around the tart evenly.

 

In a bowl add the eggs and whip lightly.  Once the eggs are well blended add the milk along with pinch of salt and a healthy grind of fresh black pepper and carefully pour over the tart.

 

Place tart in oven for 45 minutes.  If the cheese starts getting too dark place a sheet pan on a higher rack.  The main focus is to get the crust fully cooked and crisp.

 

I make this tart all the time with various ingredients.  Once you get the hang of it, this shouldn’t take you 20 minutes from saute’ to popping in the oven.

 

Cutting into thin slices, this is a perfect starter for a holiday gathering. It also makes a great meal, but don’t forget the Marsanne/Roussanne!

 

Happy Thanksgiving,

 

Stephen





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